With fall temperatures arriving in the Sweeny, Texas, area, comes fall allergens. Autumn weather brings with it different allergy and asthma triggers that you will fight. There are several things you can do to cut the number of allergens and irritants in your home.

Common Texas Allergies

Allergy sufferers notice an uptick in symptoms when fall arrives. After a long, hot summer fighting bothersome grass pollen, you’ll find yourself fighting weeds this time of year. Ragweed, the most common allergen in this region, is abundant this time of year. The plant thrives on cool nights and warm, windy days.

Weeds are prolific pollinators in the fall. Russian thistle, lambs quarter, and ragweed pollen increases to mind-boggling levels. Allergy and asthma sufferers are often diagnosed with fall allergy syndrome, a fancier term for weed allergies.

Outdoor mold is another issue for sensitive people. Mold spores show up in spring and thrive through the first frost. In the fall, spores live in the soil, in compost piles, among the leaves on the ground. After weed season is over, mold spore levels peak from mid-to-late autumn. Warm air carries spores high into the atmosphere during the day and at night they fall and settle on the ground in the cool, night air.
Indoor allergens like dust mites and pet dander increase in the fall if your indoor air quality system isn’t the best. Since your home is sealed tightly against the cold and you’ll be running the heater, inside air quality will suffer.

Fight the Mites

Dust mites live on your beds, furniture, and in the carpet. They’re small and light and are easily circulated by your home’s heating system. Clean all intake vents and registers before kicking the heat on the first time. Buy dust-proof covers for your bedding and wash it all in hot water on a regular basis. Wash curtains in hot water and dust blinds with a dust-catching cloth.

Cut Pet Dander

If you have allergies, you’re likely allergic to pet dander. Regularly groom your pets to reduce the amount of dander they put off. Try to keep pets out of bedrooms and off the furniture. Don’t place pet beds and litter boxes near heat registers. Use an air purifier to help clean the air.

Buy Double Door Mats

Most allergens and irritants come in on your family from outside. Every door should have a mat and to cut levels further, put one mat inside and one mat outside. Teach your family to wipe their feet on both. Make sure you shake out your mats about twice a week.

Clean, Clean, Clean

Thoroughly clean every room in your house from top to bottom to help capture any falling dust. Always vacuum after dusting to remove fallen allergens. Use your vacuum’s upholstery tool and go over furniture and mattresses to remove dust mites.

Experts believe that vacuuming thoroughly once or twice a week is more effective at removing allergens than vacuuming every day. Vacuuming stirs up dust and allergens into the air. By giving particles a chance to settle, you’re more likely to pick them up. Buy a vacuum with a HEPA filter to cut levels even more.

Change Your Filters

Fresh furnace filters go a long way in battling allergies and asthma flare ups. Choose a filter with a higher MERV rating to catch more particles. The higher the rating a filter has, the smaller particulates it captures.

Hire Professional Help

When you’ve done all you can, it’s time to bring in a professional. Having your ductwork cleaned will further reduce allergens and irritants in your air. At Davis, our technicians use the patented BRUSHBEAST to clear out the accumulation of dirt and grime. Consider duct cleaning if your registers are dirty, you smell odors when your system turns on, or you have indoor allergy sources like pets or candles.

If you need duct cleaning or have indoor air quality concerns, call Davis Air Conditioning and Heating at 888-710-5530. Our qualified personnel are here to answer your questions and help create the healthiest home possible for your family.

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